New approaches to treat cancer and inflammatory disease using the ubiquitin system

New approaches to treat cancer and inflammatory disease using the ubiquitin system

Project details

This project will expose you to some of the most exciting research happening in the ubiquitin field, and will teach you diverse techniques from basic biochemistry (cloning and western blotting) to complex cellular and in vivo systems (CRISPR/Cas9 targeting, laboratory models of disease).

This project will involve two parts:

  1. An inflammatory cell-based screen to identify critical inflammatory regulators 

  2. Characterisation of a class of next-generation drugs (PROTACs) using leading edge technologies.

Ultimately this work will help in our understanding of how ubiquitin signalling is deregulated in cancer and chronic inflammatory disease to aid in the development of new therapies.

About our research group

Ubiquitin is a small protein with a big role in cellular signalling, and de-regulated ubiquitin signalling is linked to several diseases. The Feltham laboratory specialises in the biology of E3 ligases, which are critical components of the ubiquitin system.

We seek to define novel roles for these proteins to aid in the development of new therapies. A major focus of our laboratory is to exploit the degradative functions of select ubiquitin proteins using ‘proteolysis targeting chimaera’ (PROTAC) technology to remove disease-causing proteins that, until now, have been considered ‘undruggable'.

Researchers:

Dr Rebecca Feltham profile photo
Dr
Rebecca
Feltham
Inflammation division

Project Type: