Measurements of malaria parasite and erythrocyte membrane interactions using cutting-edge microscopy

Measurements of malaria parasite and erythrocyte membrane interactions using cutting-edge microscopy

Project details

Malaria is one of the deadliest diseases in the world. Annually, nearly half a million deaths occur, mostly in children. Greater understanding of the interactions of the parasite with the blood cell membrane are needed to facilitate the design and development of effective vaccines and drug treatments.  

The use of functional dyes reveals the dynamic cholesterol and lipid heterogeneity at various stages of malaria invasion. This can be done through the use of a variety of advanced microscopy techniques, such as 3D super-resolution microscopy to achieve <20 nm resolution or lattice light sheet microscopy to achieve high temporal dynamics (Geoghegan and Evelyn, Nat. Comm. 2021 12(3620)).  

About our research group

Our lab is part of WEHI’s world leading microscopy facility, the Centre for Dynamic Imaging. Our team is made up of experts in confocal microscopy, light sheet, lattice light sheet and super resolution microscopy techniques and several experts in image analysis. We employ advanced and cutting-edge microscopy techniques and advanced image analysis approaches to tackle challenging problems related to various diseases such as malaria and cancer.  

These experiments will be led by Dr Kelly Rogers and Dr Michael Mlodzianoski. Dr Rogers has significant expertise in malaria biology and lattice light sheet microscopy (Geoghegan and Evelyn, Nat. Comm. 2021 12(3620)). Dr Mlodzianoski is an expert in super-resolution microscopy techniques. 

 

Email supervisors

 

Researchers:

Dr Kelly Rogers

Dr Kelly Rogers at a microscope
Dr
Kelly
Rogers
Division Head; Head, Centre for Dynamic Imaging
Dr Michael Mlodzianoski
Dr
Michael
Mlodzianoski
Advanced Technology and Biology

Project Type: