News

News

The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF)Australia’s oldest medical research institute, the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, will today unveil its new state-of-the-art $185 million research facility, expanding its capacity to deliver life-saving research.

22 November 2012
Professor Len Harrison in a lab

Stem cells in the adult pancreas have been identified that can be turned into insulin producing cells, a finding that means people with type 1 diabetes might one day be able to regenerate their own insulin-producing cells.

14 November 2012
Dr Seth Masters in a lab

Dr Seth Masters has been named a 2012 Victorian Young Tall Poppy by the Australian Institute of Policy and Science for his research into the link between inflammation, chronic disease and cancer.

14 November 2012
Professor Jerry Adams at desk

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researcher Professor Jerry Adams has been awarded the Australian Academy of Science’s highest award for biological sciences, the Macfarlane Burnet Medal.

9 November 2012
Dr Gabrielle Belz in a lab
The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has received $30.7 million in the latest round of funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), the largest amount awarded to any Australian medical research institute.
19 October 2012
Professor Doug Hilton at desk

The leaders of three prominent Australian research organisations have urged the federal government to adopt the recommendations of an independent review of the nation’s health and medical research sector.

3 October 2012
Professor Alan Cowman in a lab

Malaria researcher Professor Alan Cowman has been named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Senior International Research Scholar, his fourth award from the institute. Professor Cowman was the only Australian researcher to receive a grant from HHMI Senior International Research Scholar in 2012.

27 September 2012
Associate Professor Clare Scott in a lab

Melbourne researchers have identified a new way of protecting female fertility, offering hope to women whose fertility may be compromised by the side-effects of cancer therapy or by premature menopause.

22 September 2012
Dr Daniel Gray in a lab

Researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have discovered that a pair of molecules work together to kill so-called ‘self-reactive’ immune cells that are programmed to attack the body’s own organs. 

7 September 2012
Dr Tim Thomas and Dr Anne Voss standing in lab with notebook

The discovery of a ‘switch’ that modifies a gene known to be essential for normal heart development could explain variations in the severity of birth defects in children with DiGeorge syndrome.

24 August 2012

Pages