Dr Misty Jenkins - Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Dr Misty Jenkins - Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Location: 
Davis Auditorium
Start Time: 
Wed, 16/09/2015 - 1:00pm
End Time: 
Wed, 16/09/2015 - 2:00pm

​The Immunological Synapse: A kiss of death or inflammatory consequences for the immune system

Reconciliation Seminar Series

Dr Misty Jenkins is a Senior Research Officer and cellular immunologist at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, where she leads a small team.  Misty has had a long standing interest in cytotoxic lymphocyte biology and has spent the past ten years investigating how killer lymphocytes acquire the ability to kill cancer cells, and how they deliver the lethal hit.  After a successful PhD with Nobel Laureate Prof Peter Doherty and Prof Steve Turner at the University of Melbourne, she began her postdoctoral position with Prof Gillian Griffiths at The University of Oxford, before the lab relocated to the Cambridge Institute of Medical Research, UK.  Misty was awarded a CJ Martin Biomedical Fellowship (NHMRC) and RG Menzies fellowship for her postdoctoral training and was appointed a Fellow of The University of Cambridge, where she lived for 4 years.  Misty is funded by a New Investigator project grant from NHMRC, where she is investigating cancer and inflammation.  She has been awarded 14 awards for her work, including the L’oreal for Women in Science Fellowship for Australia (2013), a prestigious career development award from Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and was the 2012 National Association of Research Fellows ‘Investigator of the year’ for Australia.  
In addition to her research career, Misty is a passionate and engaging public speaker about the sciences and raising public awareness of the importance of medical research.  She is involved with various programs aimed at increasing young people’s engagement in science and education, particularly indigenous students.  Misty serves on a number of boards including; the board of directors for the Aurora Education Foundation (which supports indigenous students to excel at school and into their university studies); the governing board and scientific advisory panel for the National Centre for Indigenous Genomics (NCIG) at ANU in Canberra, and the federal government’s expert working group for “Indigenous engagement in the sciences” which is helping shape public policy.