Joanna Groom-Projects

Joanna Groom-Projects

Researcher: 

Projects

Dissecting the influence of cell migration on viral immune responses

We have previously revealed a role for the CXCR3 chemokine system in fine-tuning T cell effector responses. Using novel infection models paired with new ways for detecting antigen-specific T cells we are determining how CXCR3 along with its regulating transcription factors and cytokines influence the development of protective anti-viral responses.

Team member 

Leisa-Rebecca Watson in collaboration with Professor Gabrielle Belz (Molecular Immunology), Professor Charles Mackay (Charles Perkins Institute), Associate Professor Katherine Kedzierska (The University of Melbourne) and Assistant Professor James Moon (Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School, US).

Project references

Groom JR, Richmond J, Murooka TT, Sorensen EW, Sung JH, Bankert K, von Andrian UH, Moon JJ, Mempel TR, Luster AD. CXCR3 chemokine receptor-ligand interactions in the lymph node optimize CD4+ T helper 1 cell differentiation. Immunity. 2012 Dec 14;37(6):1091-103. PMID: 23123063.

Sung JH, Zhang H, Moseman EA, Alvarez D, Iannacone M, Henrickson SE, de la Torre JC, Groom JR, Luster AD, von Andrian UH. Chemokine guidance of central memory T cells is critical for antiviral recall responses in lymph nodes. Cell. 2012 Sep 14;150(6):1249-63. PMID: 22980984.

Defining where and how T cell differentiation takes place during immune responses

The cytokines and transcription factors that control CD4+ TH cell differentiation are well understood, however, less is known about how multiple, flexible differentiation programs are orchestrated in vivo.

Using whole tissue imaging, time-lapse imaging of cell migration decisions and molecular characterisation of cells based on their location, we are defining the factors that impact how cell differentiation occurs in vivo and establishing how this can be optimised to establish protective immune responses and memory.

Team members: Adrian Binek in collaboration with Wei Shi (Bioinformatics) and Kelly Rogers and Mark Scott (Imaging Laboratory).

Identification of factors that promote inflammation in autoimmune disease

A prominent feature of autoimmunity is the increased expression of type I interferon-signature genes that are predictive of active inflammation and disease.

Using a novel reporter system we are determining how cellular interactions are orchestrated during autoimmunity development and identifying new factors interrupt the expression of the interferon-signature genes that could be targeted therapeutically to treat autoimmune diseases.  

Team members: In collaboration with Dr Marco Herold, Dr Seth Masters and Professor Ian Wicks.

Project reference: Groom JR, Richmond J, Murooka TT, Sorensen EW, Sung JH, Bankert K, von Andrian UH, Moon JJ, Mempel TR, Luster AD. CXCR3 chemokine receptor-ligand interactions in the lymph node optimize CD4+ T helper 1 cell differentiation. Immunity. 2012 Dec 14;37(6):1091-103. PMID: 23123063.