Opportunities in infectious diseases

Opportunities in infectious diseases

Novel anti-HIV compounds – frameshift modulators

Stage: Lead optimisation

Team: Dr Brad Sleebs (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute), Dr Kurt Lackovic (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute), Professor Warren Tate (University of Otago)

AIDS-related illnesses are one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. Our researchers with the University of Otago are developing a novel class of small molecule drugs targeting a critical mechanism in HIV survival and replication: HIV gene translation, specifically, frameshifting.

For more information, download the printable flyer.

 

Anti-fungal drug development – two novel strategies

Stage: Hit-to-lead

Team: Dr Brad Sleebs (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute), Dr Kurt Lackovic (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute), Professor Richard Cannon (University of Otago)

Opportunistic fungal infections are associated with increasing rates of mortality and morbidity. The research team has developed a screening platform to identify novel anti-fungal candidate compounds. Opportunities exist to co-invest in the development of these compounds, as well as to identify further promising compound classes via a novel high-throughput screening approach.

For more information, download the printable flyer.

 

Development of a novel therapeutic to treat malaria

Stage: Hit-to-lead

Team: Dr Justin Boddey, Dr Brad Sleebs

Malaria is one of the most widespread parasitic diseases in the world, and the causation of profound social-economic problems. Researchers at the institute have identified Plasmepsin V (PMV) as a crucial component in the export of proteins from the malaria parasite. As such, development of therapeutics inhibiting PMV potentially leads to novel anti-malarial therapeutics.

For more information, download the printable flyer.

 

Novel anti-schistosomal drugs

Team: Dr Douglas Fairlie, Dr Erinna Lee, Associate Professor Guillaume Lessene

Stage: Hit-to-lead

Schistosomiasis, the disease caused by schistosomes (a parasitic worm), leads to a high degree of death and morbidity. Scientists have identified all the major components of an apoptotic pathway in schistosomes and by targeting one such component, sBcl-2, open an unexplored avenue for the development of first-in-class anti-schistosomal therapeutics.

For more information, download the printable flyer.

 

To discuss partnering opportunities, please contact business development associate Lauren Giorgio by email giorgio.l@wehi.edu.au or phone +61 3 9345 2779.